DIY

Eradicating Common Car Maintenance and Safety Myths

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If you own a car, you’ve certainly heard statements like “SUVs are safer than smaller units,” “warm up your engine before driving, especially during the winter season,” or even “use premium gas if you want to keep your engine clean.”

But how reliable are these bits of advice? Apparently, not a lot. Which begs the question: how many of the following common automotive misconceptions do you still believe?

For a cleaner engine, use premium fuel.

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Premium gas, which has a higher octane rating than regular gas, is recommended for high-performance automobiles and is frequently used in motorsport. Premium gas, as compared to regular gas, boosts the performance of a vehicle such as the BMW M3.

In contrast, high-octane gasoline is only a concern for strong engines. Contrary to common belief, premium gasoline is not “cleaner” than normal fuel. Unless your car has a very strong engine, it is completely unnecessary to fuel it with high octane gas.

Electric Vehicles are prone to igniting fires.

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One common misconception about electric vehicles is that they are more likely to catch fire than gasoline-powered vehicles. A few electric car fires have made international news in recent years, yet the misconception persists.

The Power of Your Car Is Affected by Performance Chips


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If you’ve ever pondered purchasing a powerful automobile, you’ve probably heard of “low-cost performance chips” that claim to increase horsepower. As it turns out, the vast majority of these chips are ineffective. These plug-and-play chips are believed to significantly increase your power. Is that even conceivable?

You’d be significantly better off having your Engine Control Unit adjusted or even obtaining mechanical engine modifications to increase power. In any event, rather than wasting money on a performance chip, get advice from your local tuning shop.

Every 3,000 miles, an oil change is required.

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Car dealers typically recommend oil changes every 3,000 miles. Oil and filter changes used to be necessary on a regular basis to maintain the engine running smoothly.

Because of advancements in engine durability and oil quality, most vehicles may now be driven safely with oil changes every 7,500 miles. Several manufacturers, like Ford and Porsche, recommend changing the oil every 10,000 miles. You may go up to 15,000 miles between oil changes if you use synthetic oil in your automobile!

SUVs Outperform Smaller Vehicles

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According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, “a bigger, heavier vehicle provides higher crash protection than a smaller, lighter vehicle, assuming no other modifications.” SUVs have a higher center of gravity, making them more prone to flip over in tight corners or during a collision. Despite having bigger brakes, SUVs require a longer braking distance to stop.

Nonetheless, automakers are working hard to improve the safety features of their SUVs by incorporating different traction and stability systems as well as strong brakes.

Is it permissible to use your phone while pumping gas?

Do you recall the first time you saw a mobile phone? They were massive and heavy, with long, extended antennas. This tale may have been true at the time. A little electrical discharge from a phone’s antenna might ignite the gasoline, resulting in a fire or a spectacular explosion.

 

Is it permissible to use your phone while pumping gas?

Do you recall the first time you saw a mobile phone? They were massive and heavy, with long, extended antennas. This tale may have been true at the time. A little electrical discharge from a phone’s antenna might ignite the gasoline, resulting in a fire or a spectacular explosion.

You’ll need a new tire if you run over a nail.

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It is a frequent myth that if you run over a nail and it shatters your tire, you must immediately purchase an expensive replacement tire. There are exceptions, which is great news!